The jellyfish and the story

The jellyfish and the story

Early in my story development I had an idea: what if the island was a jellyfish? Because a jellyfish is see-through, so you don’t expect it to have a heart. This plays along with judging a book by its cover: once you realize the jellyfish has a heart. Except, what I didn’t know at the time: the jellyfish does not actually have a heart. So much for that concept. But then I thought: what if it did?

I decided to use the jellyfish’s mysterious and more sinister essence instead. Their tentacles hiding under water could function as a symbol of there being more to see below the surface.

Jellyfish sketches. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish sketches. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish sketches. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish sketches. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Testing the jellyfish’s layers as an island. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Image source for photograph drawn on. Drawing by Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Image source for photograph drawn on. Drawing by Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Rough animatic using jellyfish to convey a somewhat mysterious setting:

I had an idea recently on how to link the lonely monster with the jellyfish. How can I visually show the audience that the jellyfish belong to the island, and that they are part of the lonely monster? I thought the answer was to design the branches to look like jellyfish tentacles. -But what if I designed the jellyfish’s tentacles to look like branches instead?

Jellyfish sketch. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish sketch. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish colour sketch. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish colour sketch. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish colour sketch. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.

Jellyfish colour study. By Benita Kvinlaug. All rights reserved.